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Deirdre's Corner

My Favorite Gifts for Families this Holiday Season - By Deirdre Imus, December 5, 2017 - The holiday season offers the opportunity to spend time with family and friends, create lasting memories, continue family traditions, and invent some of your own. 

Exclusive Interview: Deirdre Imus Is on a Mission to Save Our Kids and Remove Toxins - Alpha Rising spent time with Deirdre Imus and got an exclusive tour of the Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center at Hackensack University Medical Center in NJ. Bottom Line: The more we remove poisonous toxins, the more we save our kids' lives. 

Put Denim in Your Walls and Get Healthy: We got an inside look at all the recyclable materials used to build the Women and Children's Hospital at Hackensack University Medical Center in NJ. It turns out, you can use the same materials to remove carcinogens from your home.

Dara Berger talks to the I-Man about her book, "How To Prevent Autism"   Click Here For The Interview! 

 


 

Deirdre's Book Pick Of The Week

The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben - Are trees social beings? In this international bestseller, forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network.


High Aluminum Found in Autism Brain Tissue: New Study Indicates that Widespread Exposure to Aluminum Is Setting the Stage for Catastrophic Neurological Damage 

Deirdre's Dish Picks

 

Healthy Holiday Roasted Tricolor Carrots & Brussels Sprouts: Recipe and photo courtesy of Rebecca DeSimone - An easy, simple, & tasty healthy Holiday dish everyone will love!

If you have a fond memory from your childhood about some of the dishes we post please click here to contact us, we would love to hear your story.

 

Support The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center

The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center® is devoted to the health and well-being of children, their parents and the general public. Donations to the Environmental Health Center will support research on children's environmental health.

 

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The Imus Ranch Foundation

With the closing of The Imus Ranch For Kids with Cancer, The Imus Ranch Foundation was formed to donate 100% of all donations previously devoted to The Imus Ranch for Kids with Cancer to various other charities whose work and missions compliment those of the ranch. The initial donation from The Imus Ranch Foundation was awarded to Tackle Kids Cancer, a program of The HackensackUMC Foundation and the New York Giants.  In addition, once the Imus Ranch for Kids with Cancer is sold, 100% of those funds will be contributed to The Imus Ranch Foundation.

Recent Guests:
    « Dr. Richard Haass on What Japan's Nuclear Emergency Means for the U.S., and Why He Opposed the No-Fly Zone in Libya | Main | Frank Luntz Tries to "Win" Over Imus For the Second Time in Two Weeks »
    2:19PM

    Dr. Jim Walsh Explains Nuclear Mess in Japan, and is Therefore Smarter Than All of Us

    Dr. Jim Walsh, a research associate at MIT’s Security Studies Program, was recruited late last night to appear this program because Imus needed somebody to explain “what the hell” is going on in Japan.
     
    Unfortunately, Walsh, who focuses on nuclear issues, might not be that person. “First of all, no one knows for sure what’s going on, including the government and the utility,” he said. “Secondly, whatever they thought they knew a minute ago seems to be changing all the time.”
     
    In the aftermath of Friday’s gigantic earthquake that triggered a powerful tsunami, Japan has been scrambling to avoid nuclear meltdowns at various facilities around the country. Luckily, Walsh was able to explain to Imus—and to countless members of his audience—what a meltdown actually means.
     
    “There are fuel rods inside the reactor,” he explained. “If they’re exposed to air for any prolonged period of time, their casing begins to melt.”
     
    A partial meltdown would be where only some of the material begins to melt, but that’s not the event often portrayed in blockbuster movies. “The ultimate scenario is a full meltdown,” Walsh said. “Meaning all the fuel rods melt in their entirety, and drip down into the bottom of the reactor vessel, and there they start to mix together.”
     
    When highly-enriched uranium mixes with any other highly radioactive material, unless it’s controlled, it can explode. “Sort of a low-level nuclear explosion,” Walsh stipulated. “Not the same thing as an atom bomb, but not far from it.” At that point, the question becomes whether the radioactivity can be contained.
     
    In Japan, the nuclear reactors have containment vessels that were built as a last line of defense to keep any meltdown inside the reactor core, but Walsh said it’s unknown yet whether they’ll work. “That’s not an experiment you want to run,” he joked.
     
    Most of Japan’s nuclear power plants were built in the 1970s, and it’s unknown what effect the radiation has had, over time, on the concrete walls. While there’s some confidence the containment vessel will hold, it’s impossible to predict. If it does not, Walsh said, “Then you probably have an explosion—not as bad as Chernobyl, but in the Chernobyl neighborhood.”
     
    An explosion would disperse intense radioactivity into the air, at which point it’s pretty much Mother Nature’s call what happens next. Walsh believes that, in the event of an explosion, there will be medical consequences, both physical and mental, as people cope with anxiety over their health; debate whether to return to the neighborhood; and try to withstand the economic fallout.
     
    Walsh agreed with Imus that the idea of building nuclear plants in a country like Japan, which sits on the Pacific Plate, an earthquake-prone region also known as the Ring of Fire, sounds insane, but noted the country’s severe lack of natural resources.
     
    “They made a real commitment to civilian nuclear energy, because they figured they could rely on that, and they built the plants to withstand a major earthquake,” Walsh said. “But this isn’t a major earthquake. This is a massive earthquake, beyond what you might normally expect.”
     
    You might also normally expect the Japanese government to be honest with its people about the possible ramifications of this whole mess, but you would be wrong there, too.
     
    “The government’s tendency has been to underreport, to not put a lot of information out there,” Walsh said. Though he is sympathetic to the number of challenges presently facing the country, he stressed the need for the government to be forthcoming or risk losing its credibility.
     
    “That’s the one thing the Japanese government’s going to need,” Walsh added. 
     
    That, and a whole lottta luck.
     
    -Julie Kanfer  

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