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Don't forget to catch Deirdre's weekly Psychos segments on Thursdays at 7:35am and Blonde on Blonde segment with Lis Wiehl, Wednesdays at 7:35am on Imus in the Morning! 

 Deirdre's Dish Pick

Recipe by Deirdre Imus, The Imus Ranch: Cooking for Kids and Cowboys- Penne Primavera with Cream Sauce - The tender-crisp crunch of fresh vegetables adds not only healthy nutrition but also texture to this creamy pasta dish.  Serve it with a crisp side salad.

Genetic testing has increased in young women with breast cancer - Most young women with breast cancer appear to undergo genetic testing for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, according to results of a cross-sectional analysis of study data.

Report: Harmful gas levels in Lumber Liquidators flooring -  A national retailer sold Chinese-made flooring that emits hazardous levels of formaldehyde, a federal investigation found.

Zika HOAX exposed by South American doctors: Brain deformations caused by larvicide chemical linked to Monsanto; GM mosquitoes a 'total failure'

Deirdre's Book Pick Of The Week

 

Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals - Hal Herzog, a maverick scientist and leader in the field of anthrozoology offers a controversial, thought-provoking, and unprecedented exploration of the psychology behind the inconsistent and often paradoxical ways we think, feel, and behave towards animals.


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The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center® is devoted to the health and well-being of children, their parents and the general public. Donations to the Environmental Health Center will support research on children's environmental health.

 

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The Imus Ranch Foundation

With the closing of The Imus Ranch For Kids with Cancer, The Imus Ranch Foundation was formed to donate 100% of all donations previously devoted to The Imus Ranch for Kids with Cancer to various other charities whose work and missions compliment those of the ranch. The initial donation from The Imus Ranch Foundation was awarded to Tackle Kids Cancer, a program of The HackensackUMC Foundation and the New York Giants.  In addition, once the Imus Ranch for Kids with Cancer is sold, 100% of those funds will be contributed to The Imus Ranch Foundation.

Warner's Sports Corner

Daytona backs up promise to install SAFER barriers everywhere - Two hours after Kyle Busch slammed into a concrete wall last February at Daytona International Speedway, track president Joie Chitwood III made a stunning vow.
Howard's Future in Houston Uncertain as Rockets Look at Trades - The Houston Rockets, who enter the All-Star break one of the NBA’s most disappointing teams at 27-28 overall, have begun contacting teams about a potential trade of veteran big man Dwight Howard
Kevin Randleman Dies at Age 44 - Former UFC heavyweight champion Kevin Randleman died Thursday night at age 44.
Cameron Smith Fires Early at Pebble Beach - Australia’s Cameron Smith is in a tie for second after the first round of the Pebble Beach Pro-Am.
Los Angeles Kings fall behind quickly in 5-2 loss to New York Islanders - The Kings came up short Thursday night in a 5-2 loss to the New York Islanders at Barclays Center and equally short in trying to explain their inconsistency.
Recent Guests:
    « Dr. Richard Haass on What Japan's Nuclear Emergency Means for the U.S., and Why He Opposed the No-Fly Zone in Libya | Main | Frank Luntz Tries to "Win" Over Imus For the Second Time in Two Weeks »
    2:19PM

    Dr. Jim Walsh Explains Nuclear Mess in Japan, and is Therefore Smarter Than All of Us

    Dr. Jim Walsh, a research associate at MIT’s Security Studies Program, was recruited late last night to appear this program because Imus needed somebody to explain “what the hell” is going on in Japan.
     
    Unfortunately, Walsh, who focuses on nuclear issues, might not be that person. “First of all, no one knows for sure what’s going on, including the government and the utility,” he said. “Secondly, whatever they thought they knew a minute ago seems to be changing all the time.”
     
    In the aftermath of Friday’s gigantic earthquake that triggered a powerful tsunami, Japan has been scrambling to avoid nuclear meltdowns at various facilities around the country. Luckily, Walsh was able to explain to Imus—and to countless members of his audience—what a meltdown actually means.
     
    “There are fuel rods inside the reactor,” he explained. “If they’re exposed to air for any prolonged period of time, their casing begins to melt.”
     
    A partial meltdown would be where only some of the material begins to melt, but that’s not the event often portrayed in blockbuster movies. “The ultimate scenario is a full meltdown,” Walsh said. “Meaning all the fuel rods melt in their entirety, and drip down into the bottom of the reactor vessel, and there they start to mix together.”
     
    When highly-enriched uranium mixes with any other highly radioactive material, unless it’s controlled, it can explode. “Sort of a low-level nuclear explosion,” Walsh stipulated. “Not the same thing as an atom bomb, but not far from it.” At that point, the question becomes whether the radioactivity can be contained.
     
    In Japan, the nuclear reactors have containment vessels that were built as a last line of defense to keep any meltdown inside the reactor core, but Walsh said it’s unknown yet whether they’ll work. “That’s not an experiment you want to run,” he joked.
     
    Most of Japan’s nuclear power plants were built in the 1970s, and it’s unknown what effect the radiation has had, over time, on the concrete walls. While there’s some confidence the containment vessel will hold, it’s impossible to predict. If it does not, Walsh said, “Then you probably have an explosion—not as bad as Chernobyl, but in the Chernobyl neighborhood.”
     
    An explosion would disperse intense radioactivity into the air, at which point it’s pretty much Mother Nature’s call what happens next. Walsh believes that, in the event of an explosion, there will be medical consequences, both physical and mental, as people cope with anxiety over their health; debate whether to return to the neighborhood; and try to withstand the economic fallout.
     
    Walsh agreed with Imus that the idea of building nuclear plants in a country like Japan, which sits on the Pacific Plate, an earthquake-prone region also known as the Ring of Fire, sounds insane, but noted the country’s severe lack of natural resources.
     
    “They made a real commitment to civilian nuclear energy, because they figured they could rely on that, and they built the plants to withstand a major earthquake,” Walsh said. “But this isn’t a major earthquake. This is a massive earthquake, beyond what you might normally expect.”
     
    You might also normally expect the Japanese government to be honest with its people about the possible ramifications of this whole mess, but you would be wrong there, too.
     
    “The government’s tendency has been to underreport, to not put a lot of information out there,” Walsh said. Though he is sympathetic to the number of challenges presently facing the country, he stressed the need for the government to be forthcoming or risk losing its credibility.
     
    “That’s the one thing the Japanese government’s going to need,” Walsh added. 
     
    That, and a whole lottta luck.
     
    -Julie Kanfer  

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