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Deirdre's Corner

Don't forget to catch Deirdre on Blonde on Blonde, Wednesdays at 7:35am and Psychos, Thursday at 7:35am on Imus in the Morning! 

 


 

 

 Celebrating 15 Years Protecting Children's Health & the Environment

 The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center®  - When you are among the first voices to speak out on an issue, it’s difficult to know if anyone is listening. When I founded The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center® at Hackensack University Medical Center fifteen years ago, concern about our children's health being impacted by toxic exposures in the environment was not the hot button, trendy issue it is today.  Read more...

Deirdre's Dish Picks

Mock Chicken Szechaun Stir-Fry: By Deirdre Imus, The Imus Ranch Cooking for Kids and Cowboys - This dish uses a spicy, dark sauce known to the Szechuan region of western china – it can kick any stir-fry into high gear. You can find prepared Szechuan sauce in the Asian food section of most grocery stores. One other secret to a great stir-fry is to make sure to have all your ingredients chopped and measured before you begin because once you start cooking, this dish comes together fast. This recipe is great served with or without rice. 

If you have a fond memory from your childhood about some of the dishes we post please click here to contact us, we would love to hear your story.

If you have a Healthy Recipe that you enjoy and would like to see others indulge in, please share it with us: Deirdre.Imus@hackensackmeridian.org - You may have your recipe posted live on my Recipe Page! 

Five Dangerous Dog Vaccine Ingredients - Forty years ago, there was a popular misconception within the veterinary field that vaccines could be given continuously without harming the animal.  Since then, vets learned that vaccines last a lot longer than a year: most likely for the animal’s life.

Deirdre's Book Pick Of The Week

 

 Inoculated: How Science Lost its Soul in Autism - by Kent Heckenlively - In November of 2013, Simpson University biology professor, Dr. Brian Hooker got a call from Dr. William Thompson, a senior scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) working in vaccine safety. Their conversations would lead to explosive revelations that top officials at the CDC engaged in a systematic cover-up of data showing that earlier administration of the MMR vaccine caused increased rates of autism in children, particularly African-American males. Thompson would eventually turn over thousands of the documents to US Congressman William Poesy.

Support The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center

The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health Center® is devoted to the health and well-being of children, their parents and the general public. Donations to the Environmental Health Center will support research on children's environmental health.

 

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Inside Imus Control Center
The Imus Ranch Foundation

With the closing of The Imus Ranch For Kids with Cancer, The Imus Ranch Foundation was formed to donate 100% of all donations previously devoted to The Imus Ranch for Kids with Cancer to various other charities whose work and missions compliment those of the ranch. The initial donation from The Imus Ranch Foundation was awarded to Tackle Kids Cancer, a program of The HackensackUMC Foundation and the New York Giants.  In addition, once the Imus Ranch for Kids with Cancer is sold, 100% of those funds will be contributed to The Imus Ranch Foundation.

Sports Corner

Spurs Crush Cavaliers - San Antonio Spurs crush the Cleveland Cavaliers 103-74 as Kawhi Leonard Drops 25; LeBron James Scores 17

Knicks beat the Pistons - The New York Knicks (28-46), who waved the white flag on the season weeks ago, took control with a 15-0 run to start the second half and easily send the Pistons (35-40) to a 109-95 loss.

UConn downs Ducks to advance to its 10th straight Final Four - The Huskies halted 10-seed Oregon's Cinderella run Monday night with a 90-52 win that earned coach Geno Auriemma his 113th NCAA tournament win.


Recent Guests:
    2:10AM

    Don Imus

    Imus broadcast his first program from New York City back in 1971. His life journey has by some accounts been arduous, by other accounts a freak parade, and by still others as a matter for a RICO investigation. It began out in the great American West, California and Arizona, and eventually would make its way on across the country to Ohio and New York.

    Imus was born in Riverside, California. Ranching was the family business and he was actually raised on a big cattle spread called the Willows near Kingman, Arizona. Don recalls that period of his childhood fondly and his familiar cowboy persona is completely legitimate. His irascibility appears to be equally legitimate, influenced by more than a few hard knocks along the way. If he revels in the agony of others, as he jokes, it may just be because he’s had a little of that himself. His parents divorced when Don was fifteen, he changed schools frequently, got arrested after a school yard fight, won election in secondary school as class president and was impeached, and, at seventeen, was pushed by his mother to join the marine corps as the best strategy to keep him out of jail. While it all added up to what Imus himself has described as a fairly horrible adolescence, it also disproves a theory that he actually had no parents and instead spawned spontaneously in dust clots behind the Laundromat dryers where one day he would seek shelter. When did all of these events unfold? It doesn’t really matter. And why annoy Don by asking?

    Despite the occasional rough patch, Imus did spend a full twelve years in public school and emerged with no formal education…a product of automatic social promotion not even casually tied to merit. He graduated with no honors and no skills, a rare stroke of luck because a broadcasting career required neither. Difficulty continued to dog Imus after his school days: his undistinguished, infraction blotched stretch in the marines, onerous labor in a Superior, Arizona copper mine and a Grand Canyon uranium mine where an accident left him with both legs broken. There was work as a freight brakeman on the Southern Pacific railroad and a back injury suffered in an engine derailment and at one point the indignities of homelessness, hitching, being flat broke. Better, and worse days were to come. This quintessential American and often challenging personal passage materially defined Imus, instilling him with humility, a deep respect for our country and its workers, and a disturbing need to get even. He emerged from the experience with attributes that contributed enormously to the broadcasting distinction he would realize: an intrinsic, conspicuous authenticity, and a unique ability to connect with real people who work hard, serve their country, and care passionately about what really matters in the world.

    Once Imus began broadcasting, fame and acclaim came quickly. He was showered with the laurels of radio celebrity including inductions into both the National Association of Broadcasters and radio halls of fame. He was the recipient of four Marconi awards, broadcasting’s equivalent of Hollywood’s Oscars. It got to the point that he would throw this or that slab of walnut with crystal crap glued to it against the wall of his office as a convenient means of intimidating horrified underlings. He was featured on television programs from NBC’s “Today” show to CBS’ “60 Minutes.” He was a guest of Charlie Rose, David Letterman, and of special note, Larry King, in shameless, mutual ass-kissing marathons that challenged the audience's gag reflex.

    Don and wife Deirdre will continue to run the Imus ranch for kids with cancer, raise more millions for the Tomorrows Children Fund, the CJ Foundation for SIDS, America’s veterans and their care, autism studies, environmental concerns, and all the countless other things Don does, most with notice neither assigned nor sought.

    2:05AM

    Fox News' Bill Hemmer

    Bill Hemmer currently serves as co-anchor of FOX News Channel’s (FNC) America's Newsroom alongside Martha MacCallum (weekdays 9-11AM/ET). Hemmer joined the network in 2005 and is based in New York.

     

    As one of the network's top breaking news anchors, Hemmer has provided extensive coverage of several major stories, including the Boston Marathon bombing from Boston, MA and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting from Newtown, CT. He also reported from Haiti on the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake, from Texas on the Fort Hood shooting and from Baton Rouge, LA on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Additionally, Hemmer traveled to London in the summer of 2005 to cover the aftermath of the London terrorist attack. Recently in 2015, he contributed to the special FOX News Reporting: Timeline of Hurricane Katrina - 10th Anniversary, which took a look back at the damaging storm that centered in the Gulf Coast in 2005.

     

    During his tenure at FNC, Hemmer has contributed to the network's coverage of the 2008, 2012 and 2016 presidential elections. Most recently in August 2015, Hemmer, alongside co-anchor MacCallum moderated the 5PM/ET GOP presidential debate. According to Nielsen data, the debate averaged 6.1 million total viewers and 1.2 million viewers in the 25-54 key demo, making it the third-highest primary presidential debate ever for the network.  In addition to monitoring election night results on the signature "Bill Board," he also reported from the political conventions, and the campaign trail where he interviewed Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in 2012 and then-Senator Barack Obama in 2008. Hemmer also has hosted FNC's New Year's Eve coverage live from Time Square in New York City for the past 8 years.

     

    Prior to joining FNC, Hemmer was an anchor and correspondent at CNN. While there, he served as co-anchor of American Morning and anchor of both CNN Live Today and CNN Tonight.  A recipient of several awards and honors, including an Emmy Award in 1996, Hemmer began his career as a weekend sports anchor for WCPO-TV (CBS 9) in Cincinnati, Ohio.

     

    He earned a B.A. in broadcast journalism from Miami University in Ohio.
    2:02AM

    "Bernie & Sid"

    Bernard J. McGuirk is the executive producer of the Imus in the Morning radio program. He was born and raised in the South Bronx, New York, where he worked in his younger years as a taxi driver.

     

     

     

    Sid Rosenberg is a radio personality and the former morning host of WMEN-640 AM.  Rosenberg is known for his controversial and sarcastic humor as a host on many radio stations including, WAXY "790 The Ticket" in Miami, where he hosted his own morning show.  He originally was paired with O.J. McDuffie, formerly a wide receiver with the Miami Dolphins; McDuffie resigned his position with the station in the summer of 2006.

     

    Rosenberg's self-given jokingly middle name "Arthur" is a reference to former baseball player Dave Kingman. When Hall of Fame sportscaster Bob Murphy gave the lineups for the New York Mets, he would always give Kingman's name as "David Arthur Kingman"; Rosenberg continues this running gag on the Sports Guys by using Arthur as everybody's middle name.

     

    His radio career started in West Palm Beach, Florida, where he hosted the syndicated sports radio program The Drive on Sports Fan Radio Network in the late 1990s, after starting as an Internet broadcast. In 2000, he moved to New York City to co-host WNEW-FM's turbulent morning show, the Sports Guys. A year later, he joined the Imus in the Morning program. He shared the sports broadcasting duties with Warner Wolf before becoming the full-time sports reporter. He engaged in heated half-mock, half-serious disputes with the other members of the Imus cast, leading for example to an actual boxing bout with producer Bernard McGuirk.  Several months after joining the Imus show, he became the co-host of the midday show on Imus' flagship station, WFAN. Here, his strong knowledge of sports and distinctive, high-pitched Brooklyn accent served him well. He would hold both broadcasting positions until 2005. For several years, he also hosted the radio pre-game shows for New York Giants home games.
    2:10AM

    Don Imus

    Imus broadcast his first program from New York City back in 1971. His life journey has by some accounts been arduous, by other accounts a freak parade, and by still others as a matter for a RICO investigation. It began out in the great American West, California and Arizona, and eventually would make its way on across the country to Ohio and New York.

    Imus was born in Riverside, California. Ranching was the family business and he was actually raised on a big cattle spread called the Willows near Kingman, Arizona. Don recalls that period of his childhood fondly and his familiar cowboy persona is completely legitimate. His irascibility appears to be equally legitimate, influenced by more than a few hard knocks along the way. If he revels in the agony of others, as he jokes, it may just be because he’s had a little of that himself. His parents divorced when Don was fifteen, he changed schools frequently, got arrested after a school yard fight, won election in secondary school as class president and was impeached, and, at seventeen, was pushed by his mother to join the marine corps as the best strategy to keep him out of jail. While it all added up to what Imus himself has described as a fairly horrible adolescence, it also disproves a theory that he actually had no parents and instead spawned spontaneously in dust clots behind the Laundromat dryers where one day he would seek shelter. When did all of these events unfold? It doesn’t really matter. And why annoy Don by asking?

    Despite the occasional rough patch, Imus did spend a full twelve years in public school and emerged with no formal education…a product of automatic social promotion not even casually tied to merit. He graduated with no honors and no skills, a rare stroke of luck because a broadcasting career required neither. Difficulty continued to dog Imus after his school days: his undistinguished, infraction blotched stretch in the marines, onerous labor in a Superior, Arizona copper mine and a Grand Canyon uranium mine where an accident left him with both legs broken. There was work as a freight brakeman on the Southern Pacific railroad and a back injury suffered in an engine derailment and at one point the indignities of homelessness, hitching, being flat broke. Better, and worse days were to come. This quintessential American and often challenging personal passage materially defined Imus, instilling him with humility, a deep respect for our country and its workers, and a disturbing need to get even. He emerged from the experience with attributes that contributed enormously to the broadcasting distinction he would realize: an intrinsic, conspicuous authenticity, and a unique ability to connect with real people who work hard, serve their country, and care passionately about what really matters in the world.

    Once Imus began broadcasting, fame and acclaim came quickly. He was showered with the laurels of radio celebrity including inductions into both the National Association of Broadcasters and radio halls of fame. He was the recipient of four Marconi awards, broadcasting’s equivalent of Hollywood’s Oscars. It got to the point that he would throw this or that slab of walnut with crystal crap glued to it against the wall of his office as a convenient means of intimidating horrified underlings. He was featured on television programs from NBC’s “Today” show to CBS’ “60 Minutes.” He was a guest of Charlie Rose, David Letterman, and of special note, Larry King, in shameless, mutual ass-kissing marathons that challenged the audience's gag reflex.

    Don and wife Deirdre will continue to run the Imus ranch for kids with cancer, raise more millions for the Tomorrows Children Fund, the CJ Foundation for SIDS, America’s veterans and their care, autism studies, environmental concerns, and all the countless other things Don does, most with notice neither assigned nor sought.

    2:05AM

    Colonel Jack Jacobs

    Jack Jacobs is a retired colonel in the United States Army and a Medal of Honor recipient for his actions during the Vietnam War.